rōnin (浪人

23 Jul

My father is with me now. I carry him in my heart, my head and my hands and despite the very real sense of personal loss at his passing I would like to distil his essence for you.

I have always looked forward to seeing my dad, sharing his taste in Military History and Westerns, good comedy, dance and song, the absurd, a good bacon butty and the hwyl of the Welsh. Most of all our love of Women.

As a boy I was drawn to the history of feudal Japan, to the code of the Samurai warrior class and used to wonder ‘What must it take to face down another warrior armed only with a sword and one’s wits?’

At school I had gained a bit of a reputation as a bloody minded git. I was quite sightly built and rather gobby (I over articulated my opinions) – so I got picked on by much bigger lads. I discovered early on that, like The Borg, (verbal) resistence was futile, but a swift old bunch of fives, or kick in goolies – did the trick. Fight nasty, get in quick and don’t stop, then run like hell.

As a young man I tried to channel this aggression, by taking up Karate. At least then I could legitimately clobber an opponent. Here I am looking very pleased with myself having delivered mae geri (a kind of kick) to score the winning strike against a black belt from another club to help win our team the competition. He had bust my left cheek bone, with Uraken just before, but I kept going anyway. Hey ho!

(HL Second from right, back row)

Mae Geri

Now that I am older, I care less about the fight and more about the discipline required to avoid one. Nevertheless the existence of Ronin, so called masterless samurai still intrigues me. These were skilled samurai who had become drifters, wanderers. Loyal to no-one except to their own code of conduct – abandoned by the administration so to speak.

Kurasawa’s film, Yojimbo is the story of just such a Ronin, a story based upon a real historical figure –  Matsuo Mishimoto – who remained unbeaten as a duellist.

My father’s favourite Western was ‘The Outlaw Josey Wales” with Clint Eastwood as a 19th century American Ronin. A high plains drifter, epitomising the sensibility of an outcast soldier.

 

Musashi

But consider:

Ueshiba quote

Until my father’s passing I had not truly understood these words. Musashi does not mean – go looking for death (savage recklessness). Neither does Uesheba mean ‘be passive and always look for peace’.

No, they both imply that only discipline of the mind and body will place one in the space between Heaven and Hell (Meifumado), the here and now, where one’s knowledge of self can be applied precisely. This is an aspiration of Bushido, the Samurai code.

My wife Clare says of Miyamoto “He must have been a right bundle of laughs”.

My father, who loved Clare as his own daughter, and was, like her a cynic, would have agreed.

So what was Dad’s code?

I believe it was a version of the Six P’s.

Perfect Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance

…like acrobat Blondin here, because he was a pure Showman.

blondel

“Blondin’s first crossing of the Niagara Falls, in 1859, was the most famous feat in a life packed with them and like all the others was painstakingly prepared”

Richard Cavendish | Published in History Today Volume 59 Issue 6 June 2009

Until now I have tended to busk it, the tightrope analogy being ‘slack lining’. Not bothering with a balance pole and fooling around too much. The excuse being that, as a manic depressive, “it’s not my fault I’m like this.” The reality, being that I fall off.

Slack Line

“Collect a swift Mae Geri in the goolies lad.”

We all need to take responsibility for ourselves.

So I think I will start using the big 6P pole more from now on.

The pole representing the love and balancing support of my friends and family, I really need them to negotiate the highwire of BiPolar disorder. More Blondel, less Blondie.

That way I will be able to carry more of them safely across to the other side – like a true Ronin. Like a Dad.

IMG_3189

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