Pearl

10 Jul

Dear Reader, I may have allowed a small fragment of grit into my shoe.

I have been searching for an apprentice of sorts for some time, someone to pass on to ‘la source’ – the fountainhead, that which inspires my making. So far, lads and older blokes have approached me to learn the secrets of fettling in wood, but I have so far failed to discover anyone who can “thrill me with their acumen, Clarice”, to mis-quote Hannibal Lecter, in The Silence of the Lambs.

The Micky Mouse character in Fantasia, can do the sweeping up and the making of the tea, the blunting of the tools and the wasting of precious materials, but as soon as he opens his mouth he destroys the magic. The subjects of football, girlfriends, male boasts and fast cars result in me behaving like an utter bastard and scaring them off.

But what if the sorcerer’s apprentice was female?

Speaking of sorceresses, after my mother’s funeral one of her ex teaching colleagues from the Art Department of Mortimer Wilson School – in which my mam was Head of Textiles wrote to me:

“As a teacher your mother was the grit around which pearls formed in the classroom”.

She was indeed the Mistress of Needlework. As her first apprentice, I found this most comforting.

“She had the grit to pray for Judus if she took the notion — there warn’t no backdown to her, I judge. You may say what you want to, but in my opinion she had more sand in her than any girl I ever see; in my opinion she was just full of sand”. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn.

Sand, or grit is necessary for the formation of pearls.

Pearls C

A pearl forms when a foreign body becomes lodged in the soft tissues of an oyster – a type of tasty bivalve mollusc. In order to prevent irritation and damage to the delicate tissues, the oyster will deposit a barrier around the piece of grit – secreted from cells lining the mantle – the resulting pearly stuff is called nacre. It is the same substance from which the shell is made (mother of pearl).

Over time a beautiful opalescent pearl may form. They can be white, or, less commonly, black

black Tahitian pearls

My mother could not abide sloppy thinking, she demanded the utmost intellectual effort from all her pupils. Her grit, her inability to back down, encouraged original and clear thinking. Pearls of wisdom, if you will.

As her first born, I guess I was her first student, and she was largely responsible for the introduction of one of the the pieces of grit that led to the formation of my character. My father (“I’m Gandalf the White!) introduced the other bit.

yinyang

Back to the grit in my shoe, this is Esme McCall (aka Micky Mouse) learning how to build a dry stone wall using local grit stone.

I showed Esme how to build a wall as part of an emergency repair job for a valued client for whom we have done a little woodwork.It usually takes me a week or so to teach people the principles of ‘walling’. It took Esme about half a day to master the basic principles. True Grit, some of the toppers weighed about 50 Kg.

It occurred to me that the job of an artist is to expose the grit in the pearl, by challenging our certainties and comforts. I ran this past Kate Dore, an art historian and friend, who went further and suggested that a good artist needed to be able to expose a lot of the grit to be successful and that it took huge endeavour.

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Esme McCall’s Pear wood ‘begging bowl’

You can fill your mind with pearls, by accepting that the stones/grit within are a vital necessity – the stimulus that leads to a pearlescent end product.

“The mind is like a parachute, it does not work if it is not open”. Frank Zappa

 

Which reminds me, I need to get Clarice’s earrings fixed.

H

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