Gouge

24 Mar

I thought I would try writing this piece on my iPod – small taps of the finger to achieve a sentence or two feels like trying to whitewash the coal shed with a tooth brush, but it resembles the best approach required to carve hard wood.

Tempting though it is to select the biggest gouge in the drawer to carve a chair seat, belting the tool with a big mallet will only result in pulling out deep scars in the grain, uneven working and the need to keep sharpening your chisels often. It is better to start modestly and build up a rhythm of small even cuts, testing the behaviour of the tool against the wood. In this way, shaving away many fine curls of wood over time ‘reveals’ the shape you desire more surely than heavy handed hacking. There is no way to rush this process, nor should there be.

When we draw something or, write prose, we make constant reference to the subject – a frame work or a theme. Erasing sketch marks and redrawing, editing and re-editing sentences achieves the same refinement as careful carving. Image, meaning and form arise when constant reference to a pattern guides incremental work. Just as drawing is governed by rules of perspective, writing by grammar, style and syntax, woodworking is controlled by the properties of the timber and the behaviour of the tool in our hands.

Think of it as a meditation: many small cuts to remove a large volume of wood, multiple pencil cross hatches to render solidity and depth, words discarded before succinct prose is discovered.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

2 Responses to “Gouge”

  1. novelinsights March 24, 2013 at 11:49 pm #

    Some of my better blog posts were written via my phone, and particularly when halfway through it crashed and I had to re-write much more succinctly from memory! Looking forward to seeing what you find in that piece of wood when you have finished carving it…

    • woodenhenk March 25, 2013 at 6:25 am #

      A shapely concavity fit for a backside hopefully

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